Testing the testers: Let’s Test 2015 Reflections – Day 1

The night before

It is now almost a week since I arrived at Let’s Test near Stockholm in Sweden. I had heard a lot about Let’s Test, not least from my Weekend Testing colleagues Amy Phillips and Neil Studd. It was there this time last year that they decided to restart the Europe chapter. I had also heard a lot of good things about the conference from others in the community, all of which were overwhelmingly positive. So, as I recall my feelings and trepidations about attending and working at Let’s Test, I do it now with a renewed vigour regarding my career and learning.

The venue, nestled in a Swedish rural idyll on the Baltic coast close to Stockholm, is the perfect place. To say that it is beautiful is an understatement. The conference centre has the perfect combination of location and facilities that create a fantastic environment for learning, and of course, the socialising! After all, the conference is organised for testers, by testers.

Testers at the bar

Testers at the bar © Martin Nilsson / Lets Test Conference 2015
https://flic.kr/p/syAx7f

In addition to this challenge, I was not only running a workshop on security testing with Bill Matthews (more on that later) but I had also volunteered to be a facilitator. This meant that the workshops or talks I had volunteered for, I had to assist the speaker as much as possible with setting up and equipment, generally being a gopher for them. During the “Open Season” portion of the sessions, facilitators had to manage all the questions fielded by the attendees. The conference organisers had given us all K-Cards, to allow us all to take part fairly in the discussions. If you want to know more about K-Cards, check out this blog by Paul Holland – The history of K-Cards

Ben Simo -

Ben Simo – “there was not a breach, there was a blog’

Day One

The opening keynote was in a word, fantastic!

Ben Simo is a tester that I have been following for some time. His experiences and learning from attempting to organise health insurance on for his family would have been hilarious, if it hadn’t been so serious. “there was not a breach, there was a blog” was a fascinating journey through the issues and problems surrounding the release of healthcare.gov, the US Government website and initiative more popularly known as Obamacare.

Not only were there many functional, usability and performance issues with this site upon release, but also a huge range of potential security vulnerabilities. At the time, Ben blogged about these issues, trying to make the government aware of the problems and ultimately found himself somewhat reluctantly being the subject of media interest.

Ben is an eloquent and humorous speaker, who is extremely skilled and knowledgeable about his craft. His experiences also reflect strongly upon my recently learning in the sphere of security testing and as a result, the most significant takeaway I had from this talk was the matter of ethics when reporting issues in live, public systems. Ben emphasises the need to constantly be aware of the ethics of testing, and not harming the site. All in all, a brilliant start to proceedings.

Next up was an exciting and challenging workshop run by Emma Armstrong – “Equipping you for the unexpected challenges of testing”. I’ve known Emma for a while, but I’ve never seen her speak or run a workshop.

Emma Armstrong -

Emma Armstrong -“Equipping You For the Unexpected Challenges of Testing”

Emma had created a huge range of resources and a challenging application for us to investigate. Emma’s workshop encouraged us to examine and use a wide range and techniques and thinking in order to solve a testing problem. I really love pairing and working in groups with others, so this workshop really resonated with me. There is no better way to learn than to learn from others, in practical situations.

Emma’s enthusiasm, deep knowledge and skill in her craft is evident and clear from the content and presentation of the material. By examining and utilising thinking like Shneiderman’s Eight Golden Rules of Interface Design and Elizabeth Hendrickson’s Test Heuristic cheat sheet, we can overcome complex testing problems, without overwhelming ourselves. Using them as an oracle for any testing, where appropriate, then we can surely begin to equip ourselves for any unexpected scenario.

One of the best takeaways I had from this whole conference was during this session. I was pairing with two other testers, one from Sweden, the other from Romania. We discovered that our cultural differences, and in turn our similarities, often drive our thinking while testing. It’s not often I get to pair with testers from outside the UK, so this was a fantastic experience.

Our backgrounds and values often will impact the way we think about testing, and the problems we uncover – for example – a “Title” field would be almost unthinkable outside the UK, yet in the UK to not to be able to select whether you were Mr, Ms, Mrs, Miss or even a Captain or Lord would be equally strange.

After lunch I attended a half day workshop run by John Stevenson – “A Journey towards self learning”. I was facilitating this session, so helping out John with logistics and cold beverages! Despite my responsibilities preventing me from taking many notes, this workshop was and extremely engaging exploration of our own learning.

John Stevenson - A Journey towards self learning

John Stevenson – A Journey towards self learning

One of the major themes of the workshop was how constraints on information gathering can impact the quality of our learning and analysis of the information we gather. It can inform our opinions and how we apply values or biases to the learning we do.

One great example of this was a particular exercise. The group had to divide into three where each team had a particular task – discover as much as they could about the conference venue, with particular focus on the local flora. However each team had a major constraint imposed upon them – one was only able to use internet resources, another group could only use observations of the local environment, and the third could only speak to people at the conference venue. I went around with the third team to make sure the rules were adhered to.

The results were impressive and eye opening – whilst the team who had access to the web were able to gather a lot of data very quickly, they didn’t have the richness of data gathered by the other teams. It wasn’t easy for the other teams either, where it was fairly hard for team three to use information other than that gathered through word of mouth, as there was so much visual data to gather. Also, we were able to observe discrepancies and contradictions in the information that had been gathered. Its up to us as testers to be able to be mindful of our values and biases when analysing data, manage and work within constraints. John’s workshop was a fantastic way to engage with our own learning in an active and positive way!

All in all a fantastic start to an intense few days of learning! I’ll be blogging about day one and two over the next few days. Watch this space!

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