Something for the weekend, sir?

In what seems to now have been a storming comeback, the European chapter of Weekend Testing was a breath of fresh air in the learning opportunities for testers. You can find a link to the latest session here. Ably facilitated by Amy Phillips (@itjustbroke) and Neil Studd (@neilstudd) the session was dynamic and a great chance to talk with other testers in a relaxed environment. I didn’t even have to leave my house!

The main focus of the session was heuristics, how we understand, use and learn from them. There is a lot of great material on what heuristics are and how they can be used to inform and drive our testing ideas and execution. I won’t dwell too much on these areas but just hope to point you to some useful material:

Elizabeth Hendrikson’s Testing Heuristics Cheat Sheet

Michael Bolton’s blog post – heuristics for understanding heuristics

Anyway, my main take away from this session was the ruts that sometimes as a tester that we might sometimes get stuck in. I chose the Constraints heuristic, utilising data type attacks upon the World Chat Clock application we were all discussing.

I found myself falling back onto what now I feel to be a bit of a party piece. I immediately decided to perform a few simple XSS and SQL Injection attacks against the application. As I expected but couldn’t be sure, was that the application’s user interface would prevent these kinds of basic security vulnerabilities from being exploited. I did ultimately find a way of injecting XSS, via OWASP Mantra, but not getting it to expose any data. The bug did however cause some interesting display and wrapping issues.

Rather than looking at the functionality, usability, accessibility and its overall purpose somehow I have begun to think the worst about the software under test before I have given myself a chance to really take the time to evaluate it critically, honestly and objectively. I immediately questioned how secure the application was before I considered any other factors.

In my work at New Voice Media, I am part of a cross functional development team, and part of a community of testing interest within the business. During this time I’ve taken onboard a lot of security testing skills, with still a lot more left to learn. It may be that I have taken these skills to heart and want to use them at any opportunity, to develop them further, to discover more about the underlying behaviour of the application under test.

Yet sometimes I feel guilty that I am not approaching the testing of software from any number of other directions, using other skills and techniques. Maybe the newer skills I have learned are higher up in my priority list in my mind before I take other approaches. So, there are of course biases at play here. I’d like to explore that further and challenge them in the future.

Perhaps this has something to do with the way I personally learn things? Early in my career everything was driven from scripts and spreadsheets. There was no impetus to learn better ways of testing, only how to get testing done faster with fewer bugs and more coverage. I was learning how to manage my testing, but not being critical of the testing I was doing, nor evaluating the testing of other people.

Now this kind of learning is the bread and butter of the testers I work with now. We learn, explore, test, check, learn some more, share, improve and the cycle continues. A much more positive way of working. It’s not without its problems, as quite rightly so, you are much more accountable for your work, justifying your choices and decisions. There is a certain level of emotional maturity that we as testers need to develop in order to sustain this cycle, be accountable, share our learning appropriately, learn well from mistakes and improve from them.

This is one of the reasons why I enjoyed Weekend Testing so much. You can’t really hide or be a silent observer. You need to get stuck in and get your hands dirty!

A couple of hours on a Sunday afternoon in the past has not been a huge cost to me, as I would only be doing a bit of housework, DIY, gardening, Scouting, sport or watching something geeky on TV. Soon though however my weekends will be taken up with the ultimate challenge of parenthood, so chances to learn with peers in a relaxed environment will become fewer and far between. More on that learning experience and how it relates to testing another time.

Weekend Testing: infinitely better and more rewarding than mowing your lawn. Thanks to Neil and Amy for running such a fun and exciting session. The same goes to the other participants for the opportunity to learn from you and the excellent conversation.